1. 3M Creates State of Science Index Survey, Interview with 3M Corporate Scientist and Chief Science Advocate
  2. A New AI Algorithm Can Track Your Movements Through Walls
  3. See This Underwater Drone Capture Life Under the Sea
  4. Buying a Home in a Rising Interest Rate Environment
  5. Can A Fleet Of Tiny Flying Insects Change The World?
  6. This VR Exhibit Lets You Land On Mars
  7. Johnny Galecki’s ‘SciJinks’ Premieres On May 16 On Science Channel
  8. National Geographic Launches Open Explorer For Citizen Scientists
  9. A New Space Race to the Moon Has Begun
  10. This Heat Map Shows 8.7 Billion Strokes of Lightning
  11. The Ultimate Travel Bucket List for 2018 (and beyond)
  12. Watch the First Instagram Live with the International Space Station
  13. The International Space Station Gets A New Zero Gravity Printer
  14. Discovery Channel Uncovers Lost Treasures of Egypt
  15. Adam Savage Let’s Kids Show Off Their Mad Science Skills In Mythbusters Jr.
  16. Engineers Create A Tiny Wireless Injectable Biosensor
  17. Cruising Out of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  18. Watch: Time Lapse Camera Captures Construction of Rancho Mirage Observatory
  19. A Robotic Fish Uses A Nintendo Controller To Swim With A School Of Real Fish
  20. Water Could Shield Mars Bound Astronauts And Colonists From Harmful Radiation
  21. Interview With A Genius About National Geographic’s ‘Genius’
  22. Interview With Humans on Mars Advocate and Consultant to the Mars TV Series
  23. Is a self aware robot like Chappie possible? Yes, and soon, says scientist.
  24. Are We All Cyborgs? Interview with Futurist Jason Silva on ‘RoboCop’
  25. Mindfulness Meditation and OCD Interview with Steve Volk on Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz
  26. Interview with NASA Astronaut on ‘Gravity’ and the Dangers of Spacewalking
  27. Neuroscientist Discusses Consciousness Transfer and the Movie ‘Self/less’
Friday, July 20, 2018
  1. 3M Creates State of Science Index Survey, Interview with 3M Corporate Scientist and Chief Science Advocate
  2. A New AI Algorithm Can Track Your Movements Through Walls
  3. See This Underwater Drone Capture Life Under the Sea
  4. Buying a Home in a Rising Interest Rate Environment
  5. Can A Fleet Of Tiny Flying Insects Change The World?
  6. This VR Exhibit Lets You Land On Mars
  7. Johnny Galecki’s ‘SciJinks’ Premieres On May 16 On Science Channel
  8. National Geographic Launches Open Explorer For Citizen Scientists
  9. A New Space Race to the Moon Has Begun
  10. This Heat Map Shows 8.7 Billion Strokes of Lightning
  11. The Ultimate Travel Bucket List for 2018 (and beyond)
  12. Watch the First Instagram Live with the International Space Station
  13. The International Space Station Gets A New Zero Gravity Printer
  14. Discovery Channel Uncovers Lost Treasures of Egypt
  15. Adam Savage Let’s Kids Show Off Their Mad Science Skills In Mythbusters Jr.
  16. Engineers Create A Tiny Wireless Injectable Biosensor
  17. Cruising Out of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  18. Watch: Time Lapse Camera Captures Construction of Rancho Mirage Observatory
  19. A Robotic Fish Uses A Nintendo Controller To Swim With A School Of Real Fish
  20. Water Could Shield Mars Bound Astronauts And Colonists From Harmful Radiation
  21. Interview With A Genius About National Geographic’s ‘Genius’
  22. Interview With Humans on Mars Advocate and Consultant to the Mars TV Series
  23. Is a self aware robot like Chappie possible? Yes, and soon, says scientist.
  24. Are We All Cyborgs? Interview with Futurist Jason Silva on ‘RoboCop’
  25. Mindfulness Meditation and OCD Interview with Steve Volk on Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz
  26. Interview with NASA Astronaut on ‘Gravity’ and the Dangers of Spacewalking
  27. Neuroscientist Discusses Consciousness Transfer and the Movie ‘Self/less’
Engineers Create A Tiny Wireless Injectable Biosensor

An injectable biosensor chip smaller than a 10 gauge needle. (Photo credit: University of California San Diego)

What if you could inject a biosensor into the fluid in your skin that can monitor alcohol or other substances and control it with your smartwatch or other wearable?

Engineers at the University of California San Diego along with a start up in the Qualcomm Innovation Institute are working on a prototype that can do just that.

Less than the size of a 10 gauge needle, this wireless biosensor chip can be injected into the fluid surrounding the cells in your body. The biosensor was designed to be a low power as possible, around 970 nanowatts, which is about one million times less power than your smartphone uses when you make a phone call.

Drew Hall, project lead and an electrical engineer at the University of California San Diego said they didn’t want the chip to have a significant impact on the battery life of the wearable device.

“Since we’re implanting this, we don’t want a lot of heat being locally generated inside the body or a battery that is potentially toxic,” added Hall.

According to Hall, one of the challenges for patients in treatment programs is the lack of convenient tools for routine monitoring.

“Breathalyzers, currently the most common way to estimate blood alcohol levels, are clunky devices that require patient initiation and are not that accurate, Hall noted. A blood test is the most accurate method, but it needs to be performed by a trained technician,” said Hall. ” Tattoo-based alcohol sensors that can be worn on the skin are a promising new alternative, but they can be easily removed and are only single-use.”

“A tiny injectable sensor that can be administered in a clinic without surgery could make it easier for patients to follow a prescribed course of monitoring for extended periods of time,” adds Hall.

The biosensor is a proof-of-concept platform technology but the researchers, in collaboration with CARI Therapeutics, a start up in Qualcomm’s Institute Innovation space at the University, envision creating additional biosensors that can detect different substances of abuse and through the injection of a customized cocktail into a patient to provide long-term, personalized medical monitoring,” added Hall.

The development of the biosensor was partially supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and Samsung.

Jennifer Kite-Powell
Jennifer is an author and human tech contributor at Forbes and Modern American News covering the intersection of science and technology with art, health, environment, culture and agriculture. She's a frequent moderator of creative, AI and VR/AR panels at events and festivals worldwide and is a frequent guest on 938Now's Tech Scares. Her first book, Love, Lust, Longing and Truth was published in 2017.

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